Spring in Canyonlands and Green River, Utah

Last week we rented an RV and took our dogs to Utah. RV campingdogs come alongWe love going there in the spring. But dogs are not permitted on trails in the national parks, and it’s generally too hot – or too uncomfortable – to leave them in the car. So on previous trips, we have looked longingly at the trails but have not been able to hike. This year we did.Canyonlands-1Big Spring Canyon-4Getting to Lost CanyonBig Spring Canyon-3Squaw Canyon-1star flowersBig Spring Canyon-1Big Spring Canyon-2I’m not sure what the dogs thought about this trip.

Canyonlands is Edward Abbey territory. I keep expecting to see him flitting around the corner – or at least some visible evidence of his presence hovering. We did meet an amazing campground host named Ed, who looked and sounded somewhat like Abbee. A kindred spirit.

After our last hike – in the San Rafael Swell near Green River – we showered, fed the dogs, and cooked dinner at the trailhead before driving back to the campground. That’s living.
Bell Canyon          Bell Canyon-1slot canyon
slot canyon-1slot canyon-2large insectwhat is thisyellow profusionyellow profusion-1prickly pearprickly pear-1pistachio ice cream rocksiclepistachio ice cream rocksicle

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10 Responses to Spring in Canyonlands and Green River, Utah

  1. The Emu says:

    Fantastic pics Monica, really excellent, had to save a couple for my computer screen saver.
    One question though without me googling it, who is Edward Abbey ?
    Cheers.

    • Monica says:

      I’m so glad you like the pictures, Ian. Thanks for asking about Abbey – I love talking about him. From the Eastern U.S., Abbey became the voice of the American West, and particularly its canyon country. He was a ranger with the National Park Service in Arches National Park and wrote DESERT SOLITAIRE about his experiences there, in Canyonlands, and on the rivers which thread through this wild and starkly beautiful land. Abbey’s cantankerous voice abides no artifice, sham, or exploitation of nature. His exquisite prose has the rhythm and sound of poetry, with a rocket blast from the heart. You would love this book and his other writing, particularly the non-fiction.

      • Thanks for that info, will certainly be tracking him down at the library, would love to read his non fiction works, in the mean time, have you any you could specifically refer me to, to start me off.
        Cheers

      • Monica says:

        I would start with Desert Solitaire – the Holy Grail of Abbey’s writing. I would call it nature writing, but Abbey wanted to be thought of as a writer, not a nature writer. Whatever you call him, he is the best. I also love Down the River, a collection of stories about rivers he has run. You will enjoy, I guarantee it, Ian.

  2. Gray Dawster says:

    This was an awesome trip, I wouldn’t have minded being the stowaway on such a wicked adventure. I love your pictures Monica and thank you for adding such a wonderful posting my dear friend 🙂 With all this excitement, I am wondering what you will be doing at the weekend? 🙂 Just make sure it is a fun time and remember, be naughty, I always am 😉 lol

    Andro xxx

    • Monica says:

      Dear Andro, Thank you so much for the visit and lovely comment. I miss you and don’t seem to get notices of your posts. I need to check out your blog!
      We leave for Yellowstone, my sanity fix, this weekend. It has been too long.
      Very best to you, my friend, and I hope all is well.

  3. beeblu says:

    I love that ochre landscape – it’s stunning. “Pistachio ice cream rocksicle”, indeed. 🙂

  4. SandySays1 says:

    Your pics created a travelogue on my monitor. Fantastic. So different than Florida, my home. Makes me want to travel there.

    • Monica says:

      Thanks so much, Sandy. It is different from Florida – different from just about anywhere else. Of course I love seeing your side of the world, too. Travel in this part of the country is not to be taken lightly – it’s unforgiving.

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